Nothing Provincial about Provençal Pink

Grapefruit, peach, salmon: whichever shade of pink, rosé is fabulous all year around. Whatever you’re serving, there is a hue for you. Those were the major takeaways from a recent Wines of Provence lunch held at Arro here in Austin which featured wines chosen by Master Sommelier Craig Collins. And I enjoyed every drop of the lesson.
I love every shade of pink, in drink and color, but there is one region that is synonymous with rosé: Provence. In Provence, rosé is not a novelty or an afterthought, it is the goal. The grapes grown, the choices in production are all made with the goal of bring the finest quality rosé to the table…or porch, picnic, fireside.
Right now you may be thinking, “Fireside? I only drink pink in the summer.” Some of you may not even realize there is pink beyond the sweet stuff your aunt used to drink. To that I would say it may be time to expand your ideas about rosé.
We sampled nine rosés in three flights. Each flight was different. From very pale in color to hints of rich peach, from red fruit to black fruit, mineral-driven to floral, these wines showed a vast swing in pairing options which were reflected in the menu choices.
We began with a puff pastry with olives, anchovy, and onion. Delicious. The first course was seared shrimp with clams, mussels, and sorrel pistou. It was lovely but I had to admire from afar. They graciously pulled together an alternate for me at the host’s request (a lovely but unnecessary gesture) of tuna with green beans, radish.
Craig shared how whenever he is pairing flavors of the sea, he likes to go for acidity and minerality. The first flight spoke to that well. The grapes were classic Provençal: Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah. Red fruit, acidity, some tart and herbal notes. Some were more aromatic than others, all were balanced.

IMG_4552Domaine de la Sangliere ($16)
Maison Saint Aix ($19)
La Vidaubanaise ($15)
The second course was lamb brochette with white beans and shaved Brussels sprouts. Yes, lamb with rosé, and it worked! The herbal notes in the dish played off the wine brilliantly. This flight included two more robust rosés and one red blend. They all paired so nicely with the dish; I would be hard pressed to pick a favorite. The pink wines had red fruit, bigger, silky mouthful. The Roubine had a lot of grapefruit, herb, acid. Our one red of the lunch was black fruit, cocoa, and an intoxicating mouthfeel. Delicious.
IMG_4553

Domaine Houchart Saint-Victoire ($19)
Cuvee Classique Chateau Roubine ($25)
Chateau Vignelaure ($30,red)
Our dessert course was chosen to reflect the region’s propensity to serve cheese and nuts for a final course rather than sweets. Chef Curren hit every note with a goat cheese tart with fig, pistachio, honey, and lemon. I ate every bite. With the final course, Craig paired some really aromatic wines, each with a slightly different structure and color. This final flight was a great reflection of how color is simply a matter of grape and soil, not an indication of complexity.
Chateau Paradis ($20)
Hecht & Bannier Cotes de Provence ($18)
Ikon Rose ($35)
Let me be clear, I am biased. I went into this lunch with a firm stance on rosé. I love it. I love it in the summer and as an alternative to white in the winter. Now, granted, our winter here in Texas is mild. However, my favorite whites are acidic and crisp. I am not generally a fan of whites in a winter coat (aka oaky whites). But if I want something lighter to start a meal or sip on a warmer day, rosé provides the body, acidity, minerality to go in many directions.
Thank you to Wines of Provence, Arro, Chef Andrew Curren, and Master Sommelier Craig Collins for a wonderful lunch and for creative examples of pairing and variety in options for drinking pink.
(Lunch was provided by Wines of Provence as a promotion for the region. I received no other compensation. Thoughts and opinions are my own.)

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Wine lover. Oenophile. Wanna-be-sommelier. Mom. Mommy. MA-MAAAAA!!!!!! Grocery shopper, budding nutritionist, dish scrubber, meat cutter. My love of wine started in my mid-twenties. I have no formal training, just a decent palatte and a desire to learn. And I am pretty good in the kitchen. The more I learn, the greater the desire to educate myself through articles, blogs, travel, and surrounding myself with others who like to discuss wine. When things calm down (what's that?) in my life, I may choose a formal education in the arena, but for now, I will taste, share, and taste some more. My descriptors may or may not be "correct." My pairings may wow, surprise, or may not "work." But, the best learning is through trial and error, right? Especially when the "trial" means drinking more wine. So, if you are up for a little wisdom about wine, and a lot of wine-induced wisdom, come along for the ride

5 thoughts on “Nothing Provincial about Provençal Pink

  1. Absolutely – any time you are in the area, you are most welcome. And particularly, when you will come for WBC15, you are definitely invited!

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  2. I love Rosé at any time. Now, when I plan a wine dinner or just an outing with friends, My goal is to start with bubbles, then white, then Rosé, and only then get to the red. A gradual progression 🙂

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